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  Sep 25, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018 General Catalog

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


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Faculty

Chair: Tawfiq, Kamal S.
Professors: Ping, Wei-Chou Virgil; Twafiq, Kamal S.; Wekezer, Jerry W.
Associate Professors: AbdelRazig, Yassir; Abichou, Tarek; Hilton, Amy B. Chan; Huang,Wenrui; Mtenga; Moses, Renatus; Sobanjo, John; Spainhour, Lisa
Assistant Professors: Chen, Gang; Rambo-Roddenberry, Michelle

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering has the mission of teaching the fundamentals of civil engineering science, analysis, design, and management to empower students to assume careers as professional engineers, to conduct basic and applied research, to improve the state of knowledge of civil engineering, to serve as a source of information and advice to the community on engineering matters, and to assist in the continuing education of professional engineers and other interested individuals. The department has a special mission to provide an opportunity for a civil engineering education for minorities and women.

Opportunities and Facilities. Many opportunities exist in the field of civil engineering that encompass planning, designing, and managing a variety of projects. Your work could be on site at a project or at a computer work station. Civil and environmental engineers often find themselves involved in many of the public work projects funded by federal, state, and municipal governments, as well as those projects undertaken by the private sector. As a structural engineer, you might analyze and design structures out of steel, concrete, aluminum, timber, plastic, and other new materials that are able to support required loads and withstand natural disasters. An environmental engineer, with a background in either physical, chemical, or biological science, helps to prevent and solve environmental problems. Engineers in the geotechnical realm apply technology, field test information, and laboratory analyses related to mechanics and mathematics to create the infrastructure facilities within and on top of the earth. The structure and stability of soils determine how and where to construct tunnels, pipelines, and deep foundations as well as highways and other buildings. In hydraulic and water resources engineering, you might design, construct, or maintain facilities related to the quality and quantity of water, flood prevention, wastewater treatment, and water front erosion protection. As a professional in transportation engineering, your purpose is to move people and things in a safe and efficient manner locally and through mass transportation systems. Transportation facilities include highways, airfields, railroads, and sea ports. Several courses are also offered in construction engineering.

Instructional equipment includes the MTS structures and material testing systems with computer control for data acquisition and analysis, triaxial, CBR, LBR, and shear testing equipment and seismographs for in situ and laboratory measurements of engineering properties of soils and rocks; and a self-contained glass-sided tilting flume for investigations of flow phenomena and sediment transport. A complete stand-alone automated data acquisition and analysis system is available for undergraduate student laboratory work and research. A fully equipped water quality testing lab as well as portable field testing kits are used both for classroom teaching as well as for student research and design projects.

Students have access to a large number and variety of computer systems. A network of nearly 700 computing devices is available for the academic and research efforts of the college.

The department houses the Center for Accessibility and Safety for an Aging Population (ASAP).

ASAP concentrates its efforts on Florida where it is projected that 22 percent of the population will be 65 or older as early as 2020, the highest percentage in the nation, but the center’s research is valuable in addressing transportation issues for an aging population nationwide. The center addresses two of USDOT’s strategic goals: improving highway safety and strengthening transportation planning. Providing seniors with safe and convenient access to the goods and services they need to participate fully in society is a key issue explored by ASAP personnel. The center also focuses on transportation issues of rural and minority segments within the elderly population. The center focuses on four interdisciplinary areas: (1) Accessibility and community connectivity among older adults; (2) Human factors affecting the older population, especially regarding acceptance of emerging technologies; (3) Geometric design research, especially regarding elder crash mitigation and (4) Health, wellness and safety of seniors as it relates to multimodal transportation and emergency operations. ASAP also supports educational and outreach activities, including an annual K-12 Transportation Day, brown bag lunches, student research seed grants and dissertation fellowships and annual student research colloquia.

Additionally, the department manages a large research program called TraCS Florida. This program is funded by a grant from the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) to provide Florida law enforcement agencies (LEAs) with a cost effective way to collect and transmit electronic crash and citation data, to submit crash data electronically to the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV), and to submit citation data to local county clerks of court. The TraCS Florida team uses TraCS to develop Florida specific forms to meet the data submission requirements set by DHSMV.

Programs Offered. The department offers a program of study for the Bachelor of Science (BS) degree in civil engineering. The civil engineering major is broad-based, emphasizing all aspects of civil engineering practice, including structural analysis and design; geotechnical, construction/transportation, hydraulics, and water resources; and environmental engineering. Within the civil engineering program, the environmental engineering major is a course of study that focuses primarily on environmental engineering, hydraulics, hydrology, water resources, and the management of all types of wastewater systems. The department also offers a minor in environmental engineering science. Regardless of focus, all students are taught to apply state-of-the-art technologies to the solutions of problems in these areas.

The department offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Science (MS) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees in civil engineering. Within the MS program, the Master of Engineering (MEng) option is available. These programs provide areas of concentration in structural, geotechnical, environmental/water resources, and construction/transportation engineering. For more detailed information, please see the CEE Graduate Handbook which is available on the department website the College of Engineering’s website.

Program Educational Objectives

Consistent with the mission and goals of the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering and based upon the input and needs of its constituents, the Civil Engineering Program will produce graduates who will achieve the following program educational objectives several years after graduation. Graduates will:

  1. Graduates will progress in successful professional careers in civil and environmental engineering or related fields, and/or enroll in studies at the graduate level;
  2. Graduates will apply engineering principles to address the needs of society, including sustainability; and practice effective management, communication, and leadership skills;
  3. Graduates will respond to the rapid pace of change in civil and environmental engineering by becoming professionally licensed, engaging in ongoing continuing education and participating in professional society activities; and
  4. Graduates will contribute to work force diversity as members and leaders of multidisciplinary teams.

Student Outcomes.

By the time students graduate from the Civil Engineering program, they should attain the following outcomes:

  1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics through differential equations, science (including calculus-based physics, general chemistry, and one additional area of science), and engineering;
  2. An ability to design and conduct civil engineering experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret the resulting data;
  3. An ability to design systems, components, or processes in more than one civil engineering context to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability;
  4. An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams;
  5. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve civil engineering problems;
  6. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility, and an ability to explain basic concepts in management, business, public policy, and leadership as well as the importance of professional licensure;
  7. An ability to communicate effectively;
  8. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context;
  9. A recognition of the need for and ability to engage in lifelong learning;
  10. A knowledge of contemporary issues;
  11. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice;

Engineering Design

Following engineering design criteria established by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), the civil engineering curricula provide excellent design experiences for students. The Faculty of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering has carefully integrated design components into the curriculum with increased complexity as students’ progress toward graduation. These design components offer opportunities for students to work individually and in teams on meaningful engineering design experiences building upon the fundamental concepts of mathematics, basic sciences, humanities, social sciences, engineering topics, and oral and written communication skills. Design components in engineering course work help students develop an appreciation for and apply the knowledge of the wide variety of courses they have studied. Consequently, they participate in meaningful solutions and effective design development for practical engineering problems.

A majority of the design experiences are integrated into junior and senior level courses. For example, design experience is expanded in the civil engineering curriculum when students have completed EGM 3512 Engineering Mechanics (4) , and progress to EGN 3331 Strength of Materials (3) , then to CES 3100 Structural Analysis (3). . Students are exposed to extensive design experiences in CES 4702 Concrete Design (3).  or CES 4605 Steel Design (3). .

A major in environmental engineering includes ENV 4001 Environmental Engineering (3) , which builds on material covered in EES 3040 Introduction to Environmental Engineering Science (3) , CWR 3201 Hydraulics (3) , and is followed by CWR 4202 Hydraulic Engineering I (3)  and CWR 4101 Engineering Hydrology (3) . CGN 4800 Pre-sr Desg Prof Iss , and CGN 4802 Senior Design Project (3). , provide significant, culminating design experiences that are applied to one or two actual engineering situations for students working in multidisciplinary teams and majoring in either civil or environmental engineering.

Additional information about design credits may be obtained from departmental brochures and by contacting faculty advisers at the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

State of Florida Common Program Prerequisites

The State of Florida has identified common program prerequisites for this University degree program. Specific prerequisites are required for admission into the upper-division program and must be completed by the student at either a community college or a state university prior to being admitted to this program. Students may be admitted into the University without completing the prerequisites, but may not be admitted into the program. Students are strongly encouraged to select required lower division electives that will enhance their general education coursework and that will support their intended baccalaureate degree program. Students should consult with an academic advisor in their major degree area.

The following lists the common program prerequisites or their substitutions necessary for admission into this upper-division degree program:

  1. MAC X311 or MAC X281
  2. MAC X312 or MAC X282
  3. MAC X313 or MAC X283
  4. MAP X302 or MAC X305
  5. CHM X045/X045L or CHMX045C or CHS X440
  6. PHY X048/X048L or PHYX048C or PHYX043/X048L
  7. PHY X049/X049L or PHYX049C or PHYX044/X049L

Common Program Prerequisites can also be found at http://www.facts.org

Department Requirements

Transfer students and students within the program in civil engineering must achieve a grade of “C” or better in calculus I (MAC 2311  [4]), calculus II (MAC 2312  [4]), physics I (PHY 2048C  [5]) and chemistry I (CHM 1045  [4], CHM 1045L  [1]) prior to enrolling in any upper-level civil and environmental engineering classes. Students who do not meet this requirement may be directed to take additional academic work. Pre-Engineering students must adhere to the policies set by the College of Engineering. Students must achieve a grade of “C” or better in all transfer courses and in all courses that are prerequisites to any required or elective engineering course. In addition, students are required to earn a “C” or better in all engineering courses without any waiver as a graduation requirement. These courses cover the areas of mathematics and basic design, basic engineering science and design, civil engineering science and design, environmental engineering science and design, proficiency and core courses, and electives.

Course Repeat Policy

Criteria

A student in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering will be placed on probationary status if the student falls into any of the following situations:

  1. Accrues two grades below “C-” in a single engineering course that is required under his/her curriculum, or in MAC 2313 /3313, MAP 3305 /MAP 2302 , or PHY 2049 /PHY 3049 .
  2. Accrues a total of three grades below “C-” in engineering
  3. courses that are required under his/her curriculum, MAC 2313 /3313, MAP 3305 /MAP 2302 , and PHY 2049 /PHY 3049 .
  4. Has an overall GPA below 2.0

Consequences

A student who meets the above criteria will be placed on academic probation during the subsequent semester and will be required to sign an academic probation/readmit contract with the department. A student may not graduate while on probation.

Reinstatement

To be reinstated, the following conditions must be met:

  1. The student will have one semester (the probationary semester) to raise his/her GPA above 2.0
  2. The student must retake all courses that were the cause for probation according to an agreed upon schedule (during the probationary semester, if available) and achieve a grade of “C-“or better.

Dismissal

A student on probation will be permanently dismissed from the CEE program and will not be eligible for further reinstatement upon the following conditions:

  1. If a student who is on probation does not raise his/her GPA above 2.0 and/or achieve a grade of “C-“or better in all courses taken during the probationary semester.
  2. If a student who has been reinstated to the program subsequently falls below an overall GPA of 2.0 and/or fails to achieve a grade of “C-” or better in any math, science, or engineering course.
  3. A student who has already reached or exceeded the course repeat limits stated above prior to declaring the civil or environmental major is considered to be on reinstatement, and must achieve a grade of “C-” or better in all subsequent courses to avoid permanent dismissal.

Fundamental of Engineering Exam

All undergraduate students are encouraged to take the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam in the civil engineering discipline during their senior year.

Honors in the Major

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers Honors in the Major to encourage students to undertake independent and original research to enhance their undergraduate experience. For requirements and other information, see the “University Honors Office and Honor Societies” chapter of this General Bulletin.

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Definition of Prefixes

CCE, Civil Construction Engineering
CEG, Civil Engineering
CES, Civil Engineering Structures
CGN, Civil Engineering
CWR, Civil Water Resources
EES, Environmental Engineering Science
EGN, General Engineering
ENV, Environmental Engineering
TTE, Transportation and Traffic Engineering

Civil and Environmental Engineering Graduate Programs

Description. The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers Master of Science (MS) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) programs with concentrations in structural, geotechnical, transportation, water resources and environmental engineering. Within the MS program, the Master of Engineering (MEng) option is available. Special areas of emphasis in civil engineering are bridge design, bridge management systems, construction management, coastal construction, structural stability, and structural reliability; geo-environment, pavements, and soil dynamics; transportation networks and multimodal system; and computer-aided design and decision support systems as well as the integration of physical and numerical models of civil engineering systems. In water resources, the focus is on hydraulics, hydrology, hydrodynamics, groundwater, and the modeling of watersheds and coastal areas. Emphasis within environmental engineering includes water quality, drinking water and wastewater treatment, remediation, hazardous waste management, environmental systems analysis, and environmental sustainability.

Research Laboratories. The college has many instructional and research laboratories. Specific laboratories for the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering are geotechnical, environmental, hydraulic, pavement, construction materials, structures, the traffic automation and innovation laboratory (TRAIL), and traffic engineering laboratory.

Geotechnical laboratory facilities include equipment for soil classification, compaction, hydraulic conductivity, slurry evaluation, shear strength, and compressibility of soils. Electronic data acquisition systems, personal computers, sampling devices, and a machine shop are also available for student use.

The environmental engineering laboratories include both an undergraduate teaching lab and a graduate research lab. The facilities include equipment and instrumentation needed for physical, chemical, and microbiological analysis of water quality, sampling and filtering devices, and space for bench scale experiments.

The hydraulic laboratory is used by students to reinforce the basic concepts of hydraulics and become familiar with hydraulic equipment and instrumentation, and to learn procedures of data collection and analysis. Students can perform experiments of hydrostatic pressure, hydrostatic forces on submerged bodies, flow measurement, friction in pipe flow, pump power, open channel flow, hydraulic jump, and wave mechanics.

Pavement laboratory facilities include equipment for resilient modulus characterization of highway materials (MTS Load System, TestStar Control Unit, Triaxial Testing System, and Compaction Set). Electronic data acquisition systems, PC computers, and pavement engineering software systems are available for research and instructional use.

Construction materials laboratory facilities include equipment for compression strength testing, concrete, mixer, MTS shock tester, L.A. abrasion test machine, and MTS test system.

A structures lab, two stories high, has a three-foot reinforced concrete reaction slab with 100-kip anchorage pods spaced at four-foot intervals. This facility provides undergraduate and graduate students with applied instruction on specialized testing of materials and structures, support for high quality research in developing and testing innovative structural systems for bridges, buildings, etc. The laboratory is equipped with state-of-the-art vertical and lateral loading systems, together with automated data acquisition systems.

The department houses the Center for Accessibility and Safety for an Aging Population (ASAP).

ASAP concentrates its efforts on Florida where it is projected that 22 percent of the population will be 65 or older as early as 2020, the highest percentage in the nation, but the center’s research is valuable in addressing transportation issues for an aging population nationwide. The center addresses two of USDOT’s strategic goals: improving highway safety and strengthening transportation planning. Providing seniors with safe and convenient access to the goods and services they need to participate fully in society is a key issue explored by ASAP personnel. The center also focuses on transportation issues of rural and minority segments within the elderly population. The center focuses on four interdisciplinary areas: (1) Accessibility and community connectivity among older adults; (2) Human factors affecting the older population, especially regarding acceptance of emerging technologies; (3) Geometric design research, especially regarding elder crash mitigation and (4) Health, wellness and safety of seniors as it relates to multimodal transportation and emergency operations. ASAP also supports educational and outreach activities, including an annual K-12 Transportation Day, brown bag lunches, student research seed grants and dissertation fellowships and annual student research colloquia.

Additionally, the department manages a large research program called TraCS Florida. This program is funded by a grant from the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) to provide Florida law enforcement agencies (LEAs) with a cost effective (FREE) way to collect and transmit electronic crash and citation data, to submit crash data electronically to the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV), and to submit citation data to local county clerks of court. The TraCS Florida team uses TraCS to develop Florida specific forms to meet the data submission requirements set by DHSMV.

Computer Resources. Students have access to a large number and variety of computer systems. A network of nearly 700 computing devices is available for the academic and research efforts of the college. The Crashworthiness and Impact Analysis Laboratory is another major research endeavor housed in the department. The laboratory is a well-equipped state-of-the-art; high-performance computing environment consists of a cluster of workstations for fast visualization, and pre- and post- processing. This advanced computing environment is available primarily to graduate students working as research assistants with departmental faculty. The department also has a Sun Ultra-10 workstation that is used for environmental engineering research.

The college computers are connected to a high-speed, switched, fiber-optic LAN and to the Internet via the Florida State University connection to the NSF v BNS network. Other computation resources include the Department of Scientific Computing, FSU Academic Computing and Network Services (ACNS), and FAMU Computing Services. A small collection of reference works and heavily used books and journals is located in the College of Engineering Reading Room/ Library Services.

Students may also participate in engineering clubs such as the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE); Society of Women Engineers (SWE); American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE); Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE); Engineering Honor Society, Tau Beta Pi; Engineers Without Borders (EWB); and the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE).

Assistantships

Teaching and research assistantships are available on a competitive basis. Students who have teaching assistantships supervise laboratory courses, conduct tutorial sessions, and grade homework assignments. Research assistants work on externally sponsored research projects under the supervision of a faculty member. Letters of recommendation, evidence of communication skills, as well as GRE scores, are important considerations in the award of assistantships.

Annual stipends range from $10,000 to $16,000 for 20-hours of work per week during the academic year. A full time course load is nine (9) hours for students with at least a quarter-time (10 hour) assistantship and twelve (12) hours for those who do not have an assistantship. Out-of-state tuition and matriculation fee waivers are available on a competitive basis and on the availability of department funds for graduate assistants.

Correspondence and Information

For information concerning financial aid, research facilities, or any question on degree requirements, you may contact the graduate program coordinator, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, Florida 32310-6046. For applications, you may contact Florida A & M University Admissions. For more detailed information, please see the CEE Graduate Handbook which is available on the department website at www.eng.fsu.edu.

Articulation Courses

Students who do not possess an undergraduate degree in Civil or Environmental Engineering will be granted provisional admission and must successfully complete articulation courses and the prerequisite courses necessary for the articulation courses. The articulation courses for students pursuing graduate degrees with civil engineering specialties without a degree in Civil Engineering, or closely related field, are listed in the CEE Graduate Handbook.

Academic Policies

All students are required to adhere to the policies of the university, the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, and the CEE department. It is the responsibility of the students to be familiar with these policies early and refer to them throughout their studies. Policies include academic policies, graduation requirements, and thesis and dissertation guidelines.

University requirements and policies are provided by the FAMU Office Graduate Studies and Research and by The Graduate School at FSU (see the FSU Graduate Student Handbook). FAMU-FSU College of Engineering policies may be found on the College’s website.

It is the responsibility of the student to be familiar with and comply with all (university, college, and department) requirements. Department academic policies are described in this section.

Academic Performance

Once enrolled into a CEE graduate program, a graduate student must satisfy the following requirements for retention:

  • Maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0. If a student’s GPA falls below 3.0, the student will be placed on academic probation.
  • No grade below a “C” will be credited towards graduate degree requirements.
  • A student may repeat one (1) time a course in which a grade of “C” or lower has been earned. Only the grade and credit received in the second attempt will be used in computing the cumulative GPA.
  • Satisfy all university graduate student policies.

Coursework

A minimum of one-half the total required coursework must be taken at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering.

Prerequisites

Students must satisfy prerequisites to enroll in a course. Students entering the major without a civil or environmental engineering degree also must satisfy a set of articulation courses.

Undergraduate Courses

A maximum of two (2) 4000-level courses beyond those required for a previous degree may be accepted for graduate elective credit with prior approval from the CEE department.

Directed Individual Study (DIS)

A maximum of six (6) credit hours from up to two (2) Directed Individual Study (DIS) courses may be applied towards degree requirements with prior approval from the CEE department. The content of the DIS may not directly overlap with thesis or dissertation research work and may not be taken in place of an existing course.

Letter Grade and S/U Grading

The minimum number of hours of coursework taken on a letter-grade basis is as follow: M.S. students, at least 18 hours; M.Eng. students, at least 21 hours; and Ph.D. students, at least 21 hours.

Transfer Credit

Transfer of courses not counted toward a previous degree from another accredited graduate school is limited to six (6) semester hours. In addition, transfer of courses not counted toward a previous degree from the institution in which a student is enrolled (i.e., FAMU or FSU) is limited to twelve (12) semester hours total. In all cases, transfer credits require approval of the department and be completed with grades of “B” or better.

RCR Training

MS and PhD students are required to successfully complete responsible conduct of research (RCR) training as part of degree requirements. This applies to all students whose initial enrollment occurs in Fall 2012 or later.

MS and PhD students must complete RCR training within a year of their initial enrollment to a CEE graduate program. RCR training is optional for MEng students. PhD students who completed RCR training as M.S. students at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering do not need repeat this training.

Two options are available for RCR training:

Option 1: FSU offers the Responsible Research one-hour graduate course each spring semester. The in-state tuition and textbook will be provided by FSU for each FSU student enrolled in the course (limited to 90 students). For details, FSU’s website.

Option 2: FSU offers online training that includes seven 1-hour modules with quizzes. Topics include: Research Misconduct, Data Acquisition and Management, Responsible Authorship and Publication, Responsible Peer Review, Responsible Mentoring, Conflicts of Interest, and Collaborative Science. For additional information, see FSU’s website.

  • MS and PhD need to confirm that they have completed RCR training in a timely manner and note this in their advising, plan of study, and graduation certification forms. Students who have not successfully complete RCR training by the end of the first year will receive a registration hold, which will be removed once training is completed.

Academic Advising

All graduate students must meet with their advisor (major professor) each semester during registration period. The meeting may be a face-to-face meeting, email, phone, or online conferencing. First semester students who have not selected an advisor can meet with any CEE faculty with Graduate Directive status, preferably in their specialty area.

Graduate students will need to verify that they have met with their advisor, and provide this information (via a signed advising form or email verified by advisor) to the CEE office to have their registration hold removed. Students will not be able to register for the next semester without advising confirmation.

Annual Assessment of Progress

The major professor (advisor) will assess the progress of the graduate student each year, typically at the end of the spring semester. The student will receive this annual assessment in writing. The advisor will provide feedback on the student’s progress in completing coursework, thesis or dissertation research, manuscript preparation, and other milestones and requirements. Students with teaching assistantship (TA) or research assistantship (RA) also will receive written assessment on their performance of their duties by their supervisor.

Each year, the supervisory committee, the major professor, or the student’s advisor prior to selection of a major professor will assess the progress of the student in writing and will make available copies of the annual review to the student, departmental chair, and academic dean.

University Requirements and Policies

University requirements and policies are provided by the FAMU Office Graduate Studies and Research and by The Graduate School at FSU (e.g., FSU Graduate Student Handbook). It is the responsibility of the student to be familiar with and comply with all (university, college, and department) requirements. Key requirements and policies are highlighted here.

Full-Time and Part-Time Status

A full-time load is twelve (12) hours per semester. Nine (9) hours is considered a full-time load for students with teaching or research assistantships with of at least quarter time (or 10 hours) appointments. Also international students registered for at least nine (9) credit hours per semester are considered full-time.

A student who has completed the required course work, but has not made a final thesis or dissertation submission, shall include in the required full-time load a minimum of two (2) credit hours of thesis or dissertation per semester until completion of the degree. Those with underload permission must register for at least two (2) credit hours of thesis or dissertation per semester.

Doctoral Students Residency Requirement

For Ph.D. students enrolled at FSU, the residency requirement ensures that Doctoral students contribute to and benefit from the complete spectrum of educational, professional, and enrichment opportunities the College of Engineering provides. After having thirty (30) semester hours of graduate coursework, or being awarded the Master’s degree, the student must be continuously enrolled in the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, for a minimum of twenty-four (24) graduate semester credit hours in any 12 consecutive months.

Continuous Enrollment

Students not continuously enrolled from semester to semester during the academic year (fall and spring) may need to reapply for admission through the university.

Time to Completion

For Master’s students, all work towards the Master’s degree must be completed within seven (7) years from the time the student originally registers for graduate studies. For Doctoral students, all requirements for the Ph.D. degree must be completed within five (5) calendar years from the time the student passes the preliminary examination, or the student’s supervisory committee will require that a new preliminary examination be passed.

International Students

International students must comply with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security rules and regulations. International students enrolled at FAMU are encouraged to consult with the FAMU Office of International Education and Development. International students enrolled at FSU are encouraged to consult with the FSU Center for Global Engagement.

University Wide Standards for Teaching Assistants

Students who assume any teaching assistant (TA) role (e.g., grader, lab TA, course TA) must satisfy the minimum requirements for the specific teaching role(s). Requirements include graduate coursework or a Master’s in the discipline, participation in the Program in Instructional Excellence (PIE) fall conference and the PIE workshop on Sexual Harassment certification of spoken English for those whose native language is not English, supervision by a faculty member, and periodic evaluations. For specific requirements, see the document “University Wide Standards for Teaching Assistants,” which may be found either at the GradSpace or CEE Students organizations websites in Blackboard.

Faculty

The faculty has broad ranging interests and specialties. Faculty members, their rank, degree, and research areas are listed below:

AbdelRazig, Yassir, Associate Professor, Ph.D., Purdue University; Construction Engineering and Management, Infrastructure Assessment, Computer Applications.

Abichou, Tarek , Professor, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Environmental Geotechnics, Geotechnical Engineering, Waste Containment Systems, Groundwater Remediation, Flow in Porous Media.

Chen, Gang, Associate Professor, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, P.E.; Subsurface Transport, Environmental Biotechnology, Surface Chemistry, and Geochemistry.

Clark, Clayton, Associate Professor, Ph.D. University of Florida, P.E. Environmental Engineering; Hazardous Waste Management & Contaminant Degradation Site Monitoring & Delineation Water Resources Engineering & Hydrology Environmental & Water Chemistry Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Water Systems Pollutant Transport

Hilton, Amy B. Chan, Associate Professor, Ph.D., University of Virginia, P.E.; Application of Genetic Algorithms to Groundwater

Remediation Systems, Groundwater Modeling, Contaminant Hydrogeology, Surface Water and Estuarine Modeling.

Huang, Wenrui, Professor, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island, P.E.; Hydrodynamic and Pollutant Transport of Estuaries and other Surface Water Systems, Hydraulic and Coastal Engineering Analysis.

Jung, Sunmoon, Associate Professor, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Structural Engineering; Wind Engineering, Wind Energy, Structural Health Monitoring, Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis

Mtenga, Primus V., Professor, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, P.E.; Structural Systems; Behavior Modeling and Analysis, Wood and Wood Based Structural Components and Structures, Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of Structures, Biocomposites, Structural Mechanics.

Moses, Ren, Professor, Ph.D., Arizona State University, P.E.; Incident Detection and Management Systems, Traffic Operations and Control, Highway Safety Analysis and Remedial Measures, Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS).

Ozguven, Eren, E., Assistant Professor, Ph.D. Rutgers University; Transportation Engineering.

Wei-Chou Virgil Ping, Professor, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, P.E.; Transportation Design and Materials, Pavement Design and Management, Geotechnical Engineering.

Roddenberry, Michelle, Associate Professor, Ph.D., Virginia Tech., P.E.; Prestressed Concrete, Segmental Bridges, Bridge Durability and Structural Monitoring.

Sobanjo, John, Professor, Ph.D., Texas A & M University, P.E.; Transportation Engineering, Infrastructure Engineering and Management, Construction Engineering, Computer Applications.

Spainhour, Lisa, Professor, Ph.D., North Carolina State University, P.E.; Computer Applications in Civil Engineering, Engineering Data Management, Computer Aided Analysis and Design, Composite Materials, Structural Analysis.

Tawfiq, Kamal, Chairman and Professor, Ph.D., University of Maryland, P.E.; Geotechnical Engineering, Soil Structure Interaction, Dynamic/Nondestructive Testing, Numerical Modeling.

Graduate Course Listing according to Areas of Concentration

Definition of Prefixes

CCE - Civil Engineering Construction
CEG - Civil Engineering Geotechnical
CES - Civil Engineering Structures
CGN - Civil Engineering General
CWR - Civil Engineering Water Resources
ENV - Civil Engineering Environmental
TTE - Civil Engineering Transportation

Programs

    Bachelor’s DegreeMaster’s Degree

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